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barlow027

Page history last edited by Laura Gibbs 11 years, 3 months ago

 

HOME | Barlow's Aesop: Previous Page - Next Page

 

Barlow 27. DE LEONE ET VULPE

 

ONLINE FORUM: At the Aesopus Ning Forum, you can ask questions about this fable. You will also  find links there to additional learning materials to help you in reading the Latin (vocabulary, grammar commentary, simplified version, quizzes, macrons, etc.).

 

Leonem aegrotantem visebant animalia. Vulpes solummodo distulit officium. Ad hanc Leo legatum mittit, indicans gratissimam rem aegroto fore eius unius praesentiam. Respondet Vulpes optare se ut Leo convalescat; ceterum se minime visuram, terreri enim vestigiis quae indicabant multum quidem animalium introisse, sed exiisse nullum.

 

Translation: The animals visited the lion, who was in poor health. Only the fox put off this duty. To the fox the lion sent an ambassador, conveying the message that the presence of the fox, and only the fox, would be most welcome to the lion in his illness.  The fox answered that he wished the lion to get well soon, but as for the rest of the message, she was definitely not going to pay a visit, for she was terrified by the footprints which showed that many animals indeed had gone in, but none had come out.

 

[This translation is meant as a help in understanding the story, not as a "crib" for the Latin. I have not hesitated to change the syntax to make it flow more smoothly in English, altering the verb tense consistently to narrative past tense, etc.]

 

The Moral of the Story:

 

Nulla fides

adhibenda verbis

quae,

ni cavemus,

saepius nobis dabuntur;

capienda enim est

coniectura

tum ex verbis,

tum ex factis,

et ex illis alia,

et alia sunt iudicanda.

 

Parallels: The Latin fable on this page is the story of the lion who has grown sick and traps the animals in his cave; see Perry 142. The English poem and the illustration, however, are for the story of the fox meeting the lion for the first time; see Perry 10. For an image and an illustration that would go with this Latin fable, see Barlow 51, which has a different Latin version of the same story of the lion in the cave.

 

Illustration: For an image and an illustration that would go with this Latin fable, see Barlow 51, which has a different Latin version of the same story of the lion in the cave. This image does not match the text of the Latin fable.

 

 

 

 

This is the illustration from this edition which actually accompanies this fable - but as you can see, it is an illustration for the story of how the fox overcame her fear of the lion; it is not an illustration of the story of the fox and the footprints.

 

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