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barlow065

Page history last edited by Laura Gibbs 12 years, 6 months ago

 

HOME | Barlow's Aesop: Previous Page - Next Page

 

Barlow 65. DE IOVE ET CAMELO

 

*Not included in the Bolchazy-Carducci book.*

 

Latin Text:

 

Cum primum visus est Camelus, homines perterriti et magnitudinem admirati fugiebant. Camelus vero sui paenitens, querebatur Tauros insignes ire geminis cornibus, se inermem obiectum esse ceteris animalibus. Orat igitur Iovem ut Cornua sibi donet. Ridet Iupiter stultitiam Cameli, nec solum votum negat, sed etiam et auriculas Bestiae decurtat.

 

Here is a segmented version to help you see the grammatical patterns:

 

Cum primum

visus est Camelus,

homines

perterriti et magnitudinem admirati

fugiebant.

Camelus vero

sui paenitens,

querebatur

Tauros

insignes ire

geminis cornibus,

se inermem

obiectum esse

ceteris animalibus.

Orat igitur Iovem

ut Cornua sibi donet.

Ridet Iupiter

stultitiam Cameli,

nec solum

votum negat,

sed etiam

et auriculas Bestiae decurtat.

 

Translation: When for the first time the Camel was seen, the people, terrified and amazed at its size, ran away. The camel, in fact, dissatisfied with himself, complained that the bulls went about, so distinguished with their twin horns, while he was exposed to the rest of the animals with no protection. Therefore, the camel begged Jupiter to give him horns. Jupiter laughed at the foolishness of the camel and not only denied his request, he even cropped the beast's ears.

 

[This translation is meant as a help in understanding the story, not as a "crib" for the Latin. I have not hesitated to change the syntax to make it flow more smoothly in English, altering the verb tense consistently to narrative past tense, etc.]

 

Parallels: For parallel versions, see Perry 117.

 

Related Links: Crossword Puzzle

 

Illustration: Here is an illustration from this edition, by the renowned artist Francis Barlow; click on the image for a larger view.

 

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