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barlow079

Page history last edited by Laura Gibbs 12 years, 6 months ago

 

HOME | Barlow's Aesop: Previous Page - Next Page

 

Barlow 79. DE GRUIBUS ET ANSERIBUS

 

*Not included in the Bolchazy-Carducci book.*

 

Parallels: For parallel versions, see Perry 228.

 

Latin Text:

 

Anseres et Grues in eodem pascebantur prato. Venatoribus autem visis, Grues propter alarum longitudinem et corporum levitatem statim evolaverunt, Anseres vero cum ob inutile onus humi manebant, capti fuerunt. Fabula significat quod cum provinciae subiugatae sunt, aut urbes expugnatae, inopes facile fugiunt, divites autem capti in servitium ruunt.

 

Here is a segmented version to help you see the grammatical patterns:

 

Anseres et Grues

in eodem pascebantur prato.

Venatoribus autem visis,

Grues

propter alarum longitudinem

et corporum levitatem

statim evolaverunt,

Anseres vero

cum

ob inutile onus

humi manebant,

capti fuerunt.

Fabula significat

quod cum provinciae subiugatae sunt,

aut urbes expugnatae,

inopes facile fugiunt,

divites autem capti

in servitium ruunt.

 

Translation: The geese and the cranes were feeding in the same meadow. When they saw hunters, the cranes, on account of the length of their wings and the lightness of their bodies, were able to fly away immediately, while the geese, because of their useless weight, remained on the ground, and were captured. The fable shows that when provinces are captured or when cities are taken by storm, the poor folks are able to escape easily, while the rich men are captured and hurled into slavery.

 

[This translation is meant as a help in understanding the story, not as a "crib" for the Latin. I have not hesitated to change the syntax to make it flow more smoothly in English, altering the verb tense consistently to narrative past tense, etc.]

 

Illustration: Here is an illustration from this edition, by the renowned artist Francis Barlow; click on the image for a larger view.

 

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