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barlow084

Page history last edited by Laura Gibbs 15 years, 8 months ago

 

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Barlow 84. DE DUABUS OLLIS

 

*Not included in the Bolchazy-Carducci book.*

 

Parallels: For parallel versions, see Perry 378.

 

Latin Text:

 

Duae ollae stetere in ripa. Una erat lutea, altera aenea. Utramque tulit vis fluvii. Luteae collisionem metuenti, respondet aenea hortaturque ne quid timeat; sese enim ne collidantur satis curaturam. Tum altera, Seu me, inquit, tecum, seu te mecum flumen colliserit, cum meo utrumque fiet periculo; nam certum est a te superari.

 

Here is a segmented version to help you see the grammatical patterns:

 

Duae ollae

stetere in ripa.

Una erat lutea,

altera aenea.

Utramque tulit

vis fluvii.

Luteae collisionem metuenti,

respondet aenea

hortaturque

ne quid timeat;

sese enim

ne collidantur

satis curaturam.

Tum altera,

Seu me, inquit, tecum,

seu te mecum

flumen colliserit,

cum meo utrumque fiet periculo;

nam certum est

a te superari.

 

Translation:

 

There were two pots on a bank. One was clay, the other brass. The force of the river carried both of them away. When the clay pot was afraid of being banged into, the brass pot replied with words of encouragement that she had nothing to be afraid of; the brass pot was going to quite careful that they not bang into each other. Then the other pot said, "Whether the river bangs me into you or you into me, either way it is a danger to me, for it is a sure thing that I will be defeated by you."

 

[This translation is meant as a help in understanding the story, not as a "crib" for the Latin. I have not hesitated to change the syntax to make it flow more smoothly in English, altering the verb tense consistently to narrative past tense, etc.]

 

Illustration: Here is an illustration from this edition, by the renowned artist Francis Barlow; click on the image for a larger view.

 

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