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phaedrus096

Page history last edited by Laura Gibbs 10 years, 9 months ago

 

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Appendix 8. Religio

 

Parallels: For parallel versions, see Perry 536.

 

Vtilius nobis quid sit dic, Phoebe, obsecro,

qui Delphos et formosum Parnasum incolis.

Subito sacratae uatis horrescunt comae,

tripodes mouentur, mugit adytis Religio,

tremuntque lauri et ipse pallescit dies.

Voces resoluit icta Pytho numine:

"Audite, gentes, Delii monitus dei:

pietatem colite, uota superis reddite;

patriam, parentes, natos, castas coniuges

defendite armis, hostem ferro pellite;

amicos subleuate, miseris parcite;

bonis fauete, subdolis ite obuiam;

delicta uindicate, corripite impios,

punite turpi thalamos qui uiolant stupro;

malos cauete, nulli nimium credite."

Haec elocuta concidit uirgo furens;

furens profecto, nam quae dixit perdidit.

 

Here is the poem in a more prose-like word order for easy reading:

 

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Here is the poem with meter marks:

 

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Translation:

 

'I beseech you, reveal the way that is best for us, O Phoebus Apollo, you who dwell in Delphi and have your home on fair Parnassus.' At these words, the hair on the head of the consecrated priestess of the oracle suddenly stood on end, the tripods began to shake, and the roar of Religion boomed from the inner shine, while the laurels trembled and the day itself grew pale. Struck by the god, the Pythian priestess uttered these words, 'Listen, O nations, to the counsels of Apollo, the god of Delos: abide in piety; make good your promises to the gods in heaven; defend with military might your homeland and your parents, your children and your faithful wives; drive the enemy away with the sword; sustain your friends and be kind to the victims of misfortune; give aid to honest people and oppose lying scoundrels; avenge acts of crime and rebuke the wicked; punish all those who pollute the marriage bed with perverted adultery; watch out for evil-doers and trust no one too much.' Having pronounced these words, the virgin priestess fell into a raging frenzy -- and she was truly enraged, since her words had been spoken in vain.

 

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